Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Plant Profile - Iris



From the stately Bearded Iries, long known as the flag iris, down to the tiny plants that grow from bulbs, these flowers provide a delicate beauty in any garden.  I have many types of Iris growing in my garden but I favor the Tall Bearded Iris.  They grow from rhizomes and have fleshy hairs like a beard on the outer petals, or 'falls'.   Bearded Iris are classified by height, starting with the standard tall forms (at least 28 inches high), followed by four classes;  border, miniature tall, intermediate and standard dwarf.  The smallest bearded iris, the miniature dwarfs vary from 3 to 10 inches. 

Bearded Iris grow from rhizomes in any well drained soil in full sun, but some will tolerate partial sun. They can be transplanted between midsummer and early fall.  If midsummers are extremely dry and hot, early fall planting will help reduce stress on the plants.  Inspect the rhizomes carefully for evidence of rot or borer damage and cut away, keeping only firm healthy rhizomes.  The leaves should be cut back to 1/3 of their height.  After transplanting water thoroughly, being careful not to wash the soil away from the rhizomes and exposing the roots to the sun.  Irises should be watered often for up to three weeks after planting, particularly if the weather is dry.

They grow very well in my sandy, zone 4b garden.  A must for any garden.

10 comments:

Lavender Cottage said...

I think I like the bottom left yellow iris best Jen. Of course they're all lovely but it stands out as being pretty and elegant looking.
Judith

Piecefulafternoon said...

Ohhhhhhhh beautiful. I love irises - mine have just finished blooming for the season.

Pondside said...

We have irises near the ponds - mainly yellow - and I'll be looking for purple ones for the driveway beds now that we have the amazing deer fence.
Love your mosaic!

Carolyn said...

Lovely collage of your beautiful iris. The dwarf iris are just starting to bloom here.

Carolyn

Snap said...

Beautiful. I love bearded iris. Wonderful post with lots of information.

Roses and Lilacs said...

Followed a link from Gail's Clay and Limestone site. Wanted to see your iris. My iris are just peaking now. They really took a beating in the 90+ degree week we just had.

Nice to be able to visit a fellow blogger with about the same climate I have.
Marnie

Rosie@leavesnbloom said...

The tall bearded ones are lovely in the garden - they just don't do too well in mine - it looks as if I will have another year without a bloom even though I don't have them deeply planted.

Do you think it could be poor soil thats the cause? as mine are in a very very free draining gravel area.

Bernideen said...

Oh...I did enjoy my visit here - what alovely blog!

Rosie@leavesnbloom said...

I have not been feeding my iris plants so that explains the lack of flowers. Thats one job I need to get done soon! Thankyou for replying so promptly. :) Rosie

CollectIn Texas Gal said...

I so enjoyed your blog and your lovely photography on Mosaic Monday that I quickly added you to my CollectInTexas Gal Photos SideBar. So glad I did and have come back for another visit to browse and admire the beautiful Iris Mosaic for today. How neat to have so many to photograph. My favorites are Purple Bearded, but really I like them all. They remind me of my Grandmother who had them in her yard in Iowa, and my Mom now has plantings of those same ones from long ago...moved to Texas. I'm going to have to get some for my beds here in San Angelo, Texas. Thanks for the information about the best time to transplant.
Hope to see ya soon...Sue

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