Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Native Plant Profile - Coreopsis lanceolata




Coreopsis lanceolata is a reliable blooming and drought tolerant winner for sandy, nutrient-poor soils. It likes good drainage, acidic to neutral soil, in full sun with room to spread. Coreopsis will grow one to two feet high with narrow leaves in a rounded growth habit. Deadheading or cutting the whole plant back in midsummer will extend blooming until frost. It is easy to start from seed, which mature approximately four weeks after flowers die off and the seeds do not require cold stratification. The plant can also be divided in fall or spring, this will help with overcrowding.
 Goldfinches and Juncoes love to eat the seeds over the winter and the flowers attract butterflies and bees.
 Coreopsis is a staple in my garden, but this year I purchased Coreopsis verticillata 'Moonbeam'.



The fern like leaves is what attracted me to this plant along with its' pale yellow flowers.  It is not a long lived perennial and is very late to make an appearance in spring, but that is Ok as I do not cut back any of my perennials in the autumn. I leave the seedheads for the birds.
Both are good selections if you require a drought tolerant plant for a sunny location. 


14 comments:

Kate said...

I have a lot of this growing in my gardens. They seem to handle the most inhospitable conditions and still flower like crazy!

Gardening in a Sandbox said...

I have a big drift of coreopsis blooming in the front garden. It is so colourful. Beautiful photos.

Piecefulafternoon said...

I should put some in my garden - I love them, and have grown them before.

Pondside said...

I didn't know about cutting the plants back for more blooms - I'll do that this year. Thank you!

LDH said...

I would love to have this pretty yellow flower in my garden. I can see why it is a staple in yours! Beautiful photos and great plant info.

GrammyMouseTails said...

I always learn something when I stop by! I haven't tried this one in a long time, maybe this time will be the charm? Faythe @GMT

Edith Hope said...

Dear Jennifer, I really do so enjoy all the Coreopsis but my favourite, for which I have found space in the garden, is the relatively low growing C. 'Moonbeam'.

Jennifer said...

I was really excited a few years back, when growers launched two new pink/purple toned versions of coreopsis.
Sadly, they did not prove to be hardy in my garden however. Perhaps that proved to be the case in other gardens, as these pink/purple varieties seemed to have disappeared from nurseries in the following years.
I have seen them sold as annuals, but they are hard to find. This is a shame really, as they were very pretty.
Jennifer

Dave@TheHomeGarden said...

I'm a big fan of coreopsis! It's hard to find an easier plant to garden with. I gather the seeds each year and sprinkle them in other gardens. Moonbeam has been hardy here for three years now. Have you ever tried 'Jethro Tull'? It didn't make it through our winter.

cindy said...

quilting on your blog. Maybe I have missed it before??

I have just begun to quilt and already have 3 projects to work on.

Take care

julieQ said...

So very pretty! Hey, I made a mistake I think...dear husband gave me a miniature rose, and he wanted me to transplant it outside. So I did, and am dutifully watering very well...and it is losing every leaf it has! Help!

Ginny said...

My coreopsis blooms like mad in the spring, and then slows down considerably after that first flush. This year I cut it back - actually, thinned it out, after that first rush of blooms, and am hoping it will perform better for the rest of the summer. I love sunny yellow flowers, especially mixed in with other colors in a bouquet.

Ginny said...

I love coreopsis - mine blooms like mad in May and early June and then slows down considerably. This year I cut it back and thinned it out and am waiting to see if it will do better in July and August. The sunny yellow blooms really stand out.

Sheila said...

What beautiful photos! I sure enjoy seeing your quilts on the sidebar! Sunshine Always! Sheila